Overland Tour Part 5: The rest of Tanzania

Hi everyone!

We arrived back to Dar in the late afternoon with enough daylight left for Chris and I to get a quick swim in before dinner. We had dinner and then headed to the bar to celebrate Joy’s birthday. Earlier in the trip Michael had told her about a century (a shot of beer every minute for 100 minutes) and her birthday wish then became we complete a century. It was our earliest start the next day, with breakfast at 3:20 am and departure at 4:00. It was also to be our longest driving day yet [we didn’t know this part pre-century].This dissuaded people from participating but a few of us rallied for the occasion. Michael bowed out at shot 20, more than a little embarrassing considering the whole thing was his idea (Sorry Michael, the truth hurts). We completed the century and hung out for a while (enough time for a birthday ‘ice’) before deciding to turn in to get a bit of sleep before our giant day ahead. We headed towards the tents and Joy thought our tent was hers and started climbing in. We pointed this fact out to her and when she went to move to her tent she found it was no longer there. She was very distraught but within a few minutes she located her tent very neatly placed atop an adjacent picnic table. She still doesn’t know who was behind the birthday prank and I am not about to reveal the culprits via this blog, it will forever remain a mystery!

No sooner had we laid our heads down did we hear our alarms to wake up. Suddenly the century didn’t seem like the brightest idea considering a good percentage of us were still a little tipsy. We all made it aboard the bus on time and we set off for our destination, Arusha, in the darkness of the night. Sleep is a feat on board the trucks as the suspension is all but nonexistent and the roads in varying stages of disrepair. The seats are comfortable enough but do not recline. Most of our day oscillated between attempting to sleep and looking at the world pass by out the window. We had a pit stop for lunch which was a welcomed stretch for the legs. Back on the bus we tried our best to keep each other entertained as the hours dragged on. Our day ended as it began; in the darkness of the night. It was a gruesome 16.5 hour drive that left a group of shattered individuals. We ate supper quickly and headed to bed to forget the day that we had just endured.

The next day we headed into Arusha for a last minute shopping trip before starting our safari that afternoon. We made an additional stop at the Cultural Heritage Shopping Centre which specializes in Tanzanite. My interest was more than peaked to browse for a potential accompanying piece for my ring. Browsing the loose stones I inquired the price on a set of small princess cut stones to make into earrings and was shocked with the answer, $520 USD! The price of Tanzanite in the last 4 years has more than doubled, owing to the declining amounts of it left. They project in the next 4-7 years there will be no Tanzanite left to mine. Even now, all the large, perfect stones are done. It is a good stone to invest in but out of our (dwindling) budget. I am happy I invested 4 years ago and am more than happy with my ring.

We headed back to the campsite where we had free time to wander the local Masai markets or visit the snake enclosure located within the campsite. I had already visited lots of markets and the snakes didn’t interest me so I spent my time trying to charge our devices before the safari. We were picked up in our landrovers at 2:30 pm and headed to the town of Karatu which lies 20 kms from the Ngorongoro crater. We had a nice supper before preparing as a group a ‘flash mob dance’ for another member of group, Nat, who had a birthday the next day and said her wish was for a flash dance. We headed to bed to prepare for our early start the next morning.

We made it to the main gate of the Crater by 6:00 am and waited an hour for the necessary paper work to be processed. With the paperwork completed we started our drive into the crater, stopping at the top of the rim for photos. The last time I visited the crater there was no infrastructure at this point, now they have built a lookoff point and toilets. It was interesting to see the changes. We started our descent into the crater and I was filled with the same excitement that I had 4 years ago on my first visit. We found 2 male lions a 3 lioness very quickly and we stopped and watched them for a long time. They of course were sleeping and nonplussed with our presence. The lionesses did eventually get up and walk away, affording fantastic pictures. Eventually, the males managed to raise their heads for a few moments, look around, and promptly go back to sleep. A disclaimer is required at this point: all of the pictures found within this blog are from the lovely Tiana and her incredible zoom camera. She happily shared her photos with us which I will be eternally grateful for. It is the first time on the trip I regret not having invested in a nice camera. Her camera is a point and shoot and very small, but with the incredible technology of today it is as good (if not better) as DSLR’s. I will know for next time!

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After the lions we headed to a watering hole where we found hundreds of wildebeest and zebras. We also spotted a hyena and got incredibly close to it as it ran alongside the road. A bit further down the road we found more lionesses napping in the shade of the tree.

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We stopped for lunch at the hippo pool where we were able to eat our food on the shores of their water. The hippos were very close but within the water so posed no danger to us. As we ate I looked around at all the other trucks stopped for lunch with their passengers decked head to toe in safari gear. I stopped to ponder when safari gear became travelers dress of choice. The gear was made for African Safaris, but is still so impractical even in its intended setting. You sit in a landrover all day protected from the sun with lots of air circulation; the full-on safari gear is redundant. I couldn’t help chuckle at the sight of hundreds of tourists all in these clothes.

After lunch we continued our drive seeing more or less the same things we saw in the morning. Seeing all the vehicle’s driving around this beautiful area I couldn’t shake the nagging feeling we are a disruption to the environment. Yes, the money we spend to enter the park goes to conserving the animals area and protecting them, but it is a double edged sword as we are the reason they need to be confined and protected. It reminded me of the program manager at Antelope Park who said,

“Humans are the cancer of the world. We consume, overtake and disrupt things until there is going to be nothing left.”

A bit apocalyptic, but it echoed in my mind as we made our way out of the crater. It may seem as if I am taking a negative approach to our experiences, but I think I am taking a broader look at what we are experiencing. Our first trip I took everything at face value and was amazed with it all. I am still amazed with what we are doing on this trip, but I am looking beyond the surface of our experiences and questioning more and more the impact we are leaving. I feel a much deeper sense of appreciation of things because of this intense introspective process. As I have mentioned before I have drawn many more questions than conclusions, but I think it is a necessary process.

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Leaving the crater one vehicle headed to Olduvai Gorge, another to the Masai village, and ours to the gate of the Serengeti to process the payment. I had already done both activities, Chris, Michael, Tiana along with 2 other members of the group were not interested in either activities. We hung around the gate waiting for the papers to be approved with the hope of starting our drive early if the papers were done early. At least, that was what we were told. In reality, we had to wait for the other two trucks anyway.

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Once they finally arrived we set off into the Serengti. Serengeti is a Masai word which means “endless plains.” One side of the road had been burned in a controlled burn, making game very easy to spot. They burn to regenerate the growth the grass, and to rid ticks and other pests. We found more lionesses very quickly and they looked like they were stalking a group of gazelle, but to our disappointment they were just changing location.

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Further into the park we saw tons of thompson gazelles but went a long stretch without seeing much else. Suddenly our driver put the peddle to the metal and we were tearing through the vast plains in search of whatever came over the radio to our driver. We pulled up amongst a group of other landrovers (a sign of something good) and our driver told us there was a leopard in the tree. We spotted the leopard quickly, and with the expert set of eyes of our driver he pointed us to the kill jammed in the junction of the trunk and branches close to where the leopard was laying. As if that wasn’t exciting enough, the leopard had a cub in the adjacent tree that we witnessed scurry down its tree, walk along the ground, climb moms tree, and begin to feed on the kill. It was a remarkable spotting and we were content observing for quite some time.

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After the excitement of the leopard we began making our way to our campsite for the evening, watching one of the most magnificent African Sunsets we have experienced along the way. The game viewing may have not been the best, but the sunset more than made up for it. Pictures do not do it any justice, but I will share a few with you. Almost to the campsite I spotted a serval cat, a medium sized cat that looked like a mix between a domestic cat and a cheetah. It was a great way to cap the day!

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Our campsite for the evening was basic and packed full with other safari goers. The line for the showers was impossible, I remember our campsites from my last safari as almost deserted, it was quite the contrast. We gave up the hope of a shower and traded it for a bottle of wine before dinner. Dinner was spaghetti bolognase; an unfortunate meal as we had been eating it every second meal for the past 20ish days. After dinner we chatted a while before revealing our flash dance for Nat, she was very pleased if not a bit embarrassed. Our grand finale was to throw rice in the air over her, it was perfect. A group of us stayed up drinking and chatting happily about the day and what we had been able to see, and what we were hopeful to see the next day. Michael stepped out of where we were hanging out for a minute and when he returned he told us he had a run in with a buffalo! We could hear it outside and began shining our torches and were surprised to see more than one set of eyes outside the building we were in. They slowly made their way around the front of the building until they were close to the door, blocking our only exit point between us and our tents. We were all petrified to leave as buffalo are one of the more dangerous animals when it comes to people. We decided to go as a group to our tents (which were no more than 200 meters from the buffalo) and we made it safely. Later in the night the camp was also visited by an elephant! No where else in the world would you be as concerned about getting out of your tent at night as you are in Africa!

We started our game drive as the sun rose the following morning and were optimistic about the day. Within 45 minutes we had already seen heaps (thanks for the word Michael) more animals than the day before. As had happened on numerous other game drives our driver got a message over the radio and upon setting the receiver down we took off at top speed towards an unknown animal. Whenever this happens you get a very excited feeling, almost like the ‘Christmas Morning’ feeling, with the anticipation of what you are going to see. This time we were lucky enough to see a cheetah walking down the middle of the road. After strolling along he moved to the side of the road and would walk for a bit before sitting down, then laying down, then repeating the process. Tiana was able to get some incredible shots of this, check them out below! Cheetahs are incredibly elegant animals and we were so lucky to be able to spend so much time with this one.

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Just as quickly as it appeared, it disappeared into the long grass. Cheetahs are usually found in a pair, and sure enough a few hundres meters down the road way in the distance we spotted the mate. It was an excellent start to the day.
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We took off racing again and this time a pride of lions was waiting for us, with the male lion sitting as close to the road as he could possibly be. This allowed vehicles to pull up directly adjacent to him. It was an absolutely spectacular viewing; we could see every nick and scratch on his body. He finally got fed up and let out a low growl at one vehicle before walking off to the other side of the road, further away from the vehicles.

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We then spent some time observing the lionesses who had been in the background. At one point, a hippo came out of no where running full tilt close to the lionesses (they are surprisingly fast) and a few of the lionesses sat up out of curiosity to watch it. This allowed for some more great shots!
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As we were driving to the Serengeti Visitors Centre our guide spotted 3 lions sleeping in a tree. I have never seen a lion in a tree (only leopards), and one of them was precious in how he was hanging (literally) out of the tree. Check out thr adorable pictures below!

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We spent 45 minutes at the visitors centre with a guide who took us through a brief history of the Serengti. He talked about what currently threatens the animals and the land and how they are trying to combat these things. Of course poachers are a big problem that are difficult to fight. They set fires to distract the rangers so while the rangers are battling the fire they can poach an animal. The rangers have to think of the greater good for the collective group of animals so always must contain the fire. It is a huge challenge that every park faces. The demand for poached animals needs to be eliminated before the poachers can be, and unfortunately this is more of a political battle.

After the visitors centre we game drived our way out of the park. On the way we spotted two sleeping male lions and got some great shots in the afternoon light. We had lunch at the Serengti main gate before making the long journey back to Arusha.

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As we drove I compared my two safari experiences. I must say we were incredibly lucky this second time round to see as much as we did in essentially two game drives. The last time i visited I did a 7 night 6 day safari and actually saw less than this visit as I did not see any male lions on my last visit. It reaffirms the analogy that game driving is much like fishing.

The next day we made our way Pole, Pole (slowly, slowly in Swahili) to Nairobi, Kenya. I will document our time in Kenya in our next post. Cheers!

** *We booked our tour through African Overland Safaris, the Adventure Travel Division of Tshokwane Safaris, on behalf of Africa Travel Co. We experienced incredible customer service and were fully satisfied with the price we paid and the information we were provided about the tour. Find more information at: http://www.african-overland-safaris.com OR http://www.tshokwanesafaris.com.

Overland tour part 4: Malawi and Tanzania

Hi Everyone!

We made it to the border of Malawi early in the morning and made it through the formalities surprisingly fast. Immediately after crossing the border I noticed a major change in the scenery. Malawi is incredibly lush and much more mountainous then the other countries we have visited to this point. It made the drive go by quickly as I was enthralled with the scenery.

We continued on to our final destination, Kande Beach, arriving by late afternoon. Kande Beach is located on Lake Malawi which is the third largest lake in Africa. Chris and I headed to the white sand beach to watch the beautiful sunset. It was hard to believe what we were looking at was a lake, it is so massive it really fools you into thinking it is an ocean.

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The next day we woke early for a morning village tour with our group. We had a local tour guide who showed us us how they make bricks to construct their houses, gave us a tour of his house, and then we proceeded to the local school. The principal gave us a briefing on the school which goes up to year 8 and has 120 to 200 students per year. Chris and I were happy to see the Canadian Flag on numerous things within the classrooms, we were told 2 Canadians taught at the school for several years and were able to obtain sponsors for things the school required. As soon as we arrived at the school we were mauled by children wanting to hold our hands and climb on our backs. Luckily there was enough members of our group that were keen to indulge them that Chris and I weaseled our way out of engaging them. It just felt too much like they were trained to do this with every group. It caused me to stop and for the millionth time ask myself the age old question of whether traveling does more harm than good. As soon as any members of the group tried to hand out pens or paper they were overwhelmed with grabbing hands from all angles trying to snatch anything and everything. Is that a positive impact or negative? I always think back to what our tour guide Manda said when asked if we could give food to the local children or animals;

If we feed them today, who feeds them tomorrow?

The same applies to giving handouts of any kind. If tourists stop visiting the area, will they suffer from the interruption of the distribution of things from strangers? I haven’t come to any conclusions but I can’t shake the nagging feeling in some way I am negatively impacting the places I visit, even though I am not the one giving the handouts my presence still has an impact. I hope to have a clearer stance on this issue the more I travel.

Back to the tour: while observing the children I noticed one small child with a sweater that read “My roots are in Cape Breton.” What are the chances a child in rural Malawi would be wearing a Cape Breton sweater? I didn’t bring a camera with me but I do wish I had solely for a picture of that sweater.

After the school some people requested to see the church [it was a Sunday], and despite the principal trying to dissuade them as there was a service going on they got their way and we were brought to the church. Chris and I and one other couple kept a major distance from the doors of the church as we could hear the singing from outside which was enough for us. To our absolute disbelief some members of the group marched straight up the stairs of the church and proceeded to stick their DSLR cameras in the door and film the service. It was one of the most disrespectful acts we have witnessed to date. Other members of the group were much more respectful and asked to enter the church to observe the service [not just stick a camera in the door and hit record]. I am all for being a part of the church by attending the entire service, but to just show up and film a few minutes and leave is unimaginable to me. If I was at church at home and a bunch of tourists did that during the service I was attending I would be outraged! For the rest of the tour I spent it wondering how much longer there was left. It finally ended after a brief visit to the local clinic. We headed back to camp for lunch, and then Chris and a few others headed out snorkeling while I opted to stay back and relax on the beach. I did indulge in a swim in the lake even though I had learned in the course of preparing for my travel medicine certification that their is a risk of schistosomiasis by swimming. The water was just too tempting in the scorching afternoon sun. We visited a local pharmacy who provided us with praziquantel tablets to take in 6 weeks to treat ourselves as a precaution. A good experience for my own personal knowledge as a practitioner!

The next day we headed further north to Chitimba campsite which was also on the shores of Lake Malawi. We spent the afternoon browsing the local market where we were very tempted to buy a table and chairs. Unfortunately, it would be an arm and a leg to post them home and we are unable to carry them with us so we didn’t end up buying them. I settled for two bracelets that will perfectly match a necklace I bought in Ecuador. After the markets we had a game of beach volleyball before dinner and an early bedtime as it was one of our biggest driving days the following day.

Breakfast was served at the ungodly hour of 4 am and we left by 4:45 am. We made it to the border of Tanzania by 8:30 and I was happy to put my [very basic] swahili to use. It was a surreal feeling to be back so soon, I always knew I would come back but I expected it to be later in life. We made our way through Tukuyu tea and banana plantations to our campsite for the evening, Iringa Farmhouse. We arrived after dark and were exhausted after such a long day in the truck so we had quick showers, a quick dinner, and then it was bedtime.

The next day was yet another massive driving day as our destination was Dar es Salaam which was 500 km from Iringa. That may not seem that far but the road conditions, corrupt cops who stop you incessantly, and the horrendous traffic in Dar quickly made what would be a 5 hour journey in Canada to a 12+ hour in Tanzania.

I have described my time in Dar at length to Chris in the 4 years since I have visited and I was very excited for him to finally see things for himself. He couldn’t believe how mental it was, and how accurate my descriptions over the years were. We sat in traffic for over 2 hours trying to make it through one intersection. While waiting we witnessed numerous cars driving on the “sidewalk,” blocking the way of an ambulance for over 30 minutes. The hawkers weaved their way through traffic endlessly clinking their change in their hands to attract your attention. That is the one sound that dominates in my memory from my time spent in Dar. I reflected on all that has happened in my life since last being in Dar during our wait in traffic. When I first visited to volunteer at Pasada I had not truly traveled internationally and it was a very overwhelming and challenging experience that definitely pushed me out of my comfort zone. I think I grew a lot as a person on that trip and it was part of the ‘spark’ that ignited the fire in me to continue traveling. Now here I am 4 years later, back where it all started in a way. It was a very significant moment for me and I couldn’t help smiling.

We arrived at our campsite and had a quick dinner before a group of us played a very fun game introduced to us by Miss Joy from Ireland. The game is called sardines and works like this; one person hides in a place and everyone else needs to find them, but when you find them you join them in hiding one by one until there is only one person left looking. That person loses the round and is responsible for hiding first in the next round. It is called sardines because inevitably you all end up crammed into one small little space like a tin of sardines. It was absolutely hilarious, a group of adults playing this game and having a total blast. Tiana and I won the best hiding site, we hid in plain site under a table in the bar. It took 15 minutes for anyone to find us, and over 35 minutes for the round to end. The bartenders laughed endlessly at us and probably thought we were a bunch of drunks, when in reality we were all sober!

The next day was yet another early morning as we were making our way to Zanzibar. We had to take the commuter ferry to downtown Dar and then make our way to the Zanzibar ferry terminal. I had taken the commuter ferry last time so I knew what a gongshow it was going to be. It didn’t disappoint and the others were a bit overwhelmed. We then commissioned a local bus to take us to the Zanzibar terminal, kicking all the poor locals off who were trying to make their way to work. When we arrived to the ferry terminal we only had to wait a few minutes before the chaos of Dar truly hit; we had to make it through the entrance gate, clear security and then board the boat. It was typical Africa with everyone trying to push in, butt the line, sell you things, or scam you in one way or another. We all eventually made our way onto the boat but were a little worse for wear. The crossing took an hour and a half and was relatively calm. We were lucky and had been upgraded to business class, meaning we had very luxurious and comfortable seats. Upon arriving to Zanzibar we had to have our luggage checked for plastic bags (they are banned in Zanzibar) and it was even worse mayhem than boarding the boat. I looked at the dismayed and frantic faces of my fellow travelers and was reminded what that feeling was like. At this point in the trip not much frazzles Chris or I, but it is a feeling that is etched in our minds forever so we could relate to our fellow travelers.

Finishing the formalities at the ferry terminal we walked to our hotel for the evening; The Karibu Inn. For $50 USD a night it was incredibly basic, it didn’t even have a sheet on the bed! Nevertheless, it was a bed and a very welcomed change from the tent. The rest of the day was free time, Chris and I opted to do none of the excursions as they were expensive and we really wanted a break from the group to do our own thing. We headed to a restaurant on the beach and ordered a snack platter and beers, sitting back and relishing the view. After a while Michael joined us, having his rubber arm twisted into having a few beers with us.

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After a few hours of relaxing we decided to explore the rest of Stone Town a bit. We had looked up a few things in a lonely planet book in a local bookstore and had read that a place called Jaws Corner had incredible local coffee and was a good place to mingle with the locals. We found it relatively easily and immediately located the guy selling the coffee. He had a simple setup; the used cups were dumped into a bucket of water and immediately refilled from a kettle kept warm over charcoal. Despite the questionable sanitary conditions Chris and I both bought a cup, and a round for the locals playing Dominos. The coffee was incredible, the best we have had in a long time. Michael was not to be persuaded in joining us for a cup, he thought we were absolutely mental. I had to agree after I witnessed the coffee man refilling his kettle from a filthy bucket of pre-made coffee. I still had a second cup.

Chris and I were very happy to be back on our own and interacting with the locals. As much as the tour is convenient it certainly is carried out in opposite manner to our traveling philosophy. It is allowing us to cover a lot of ground and see a ton of the continent, and we are taking note of our favorite places for when we return. When we do come back we will definitely rent or buy a 4×4 and travel on our own.

After Jaws Corner Michael, Chris and I browsed the markets and worked a smoking deal for Michael on a traditional game board. We then went on the hunt for the local spirit, Konyagi, to try before heading to the famous Forodhani Gardens food market. The Konyagi was very similar to gin, and we had fun with the group passing it around before going for a bite. I had oodles of fun bartering over the food price, I was determined not to get Mzungu (Western Person) priced. I was very successful, my best price was 1/4th the price of what the rest of the group paid for the same thing. Our favorite dish of the night was a freshly grilled beef “pizza.” It wasn’t anything resembling what pizza at home was like, but it was delicious. I was hoping to have some seafood but the seafood looked as though it had been caught a few days ago so I stayed clear. It was a really lovely evening, after finishing our dinner we headed to a few of the girls room and sat around chatting and joking for a few hours.

The next day Tiana, Raj and I hit up the local shops. I am proud to say I invested in two paintings – the most I have ever purchased! Chris and I decided we want a few travel mementos for our apartment whenever we return home. After shopping we headed back to the meet the group to leave to the north of the island to Nungwi Beach. The group was staying at one resort called Ammani Lodge, while Chris, Michael, Tiana and I opted for the cheaper option across the road. The price at Ammani was $90 USD per night per room, while ours was $50 USD. Zanzibar is not cheap and we wanted to save money any way we could. Our accommodation was basic but adequate, and even included a decent breakfast in the rate.

We only had an hour before it was time to head out on our booze cruise. 8 members of our group along with our guide and guide in training opted for the booze cruise. We were expecting a boat with a designated bar area, some tables and seating and lots of room to move. What we got was a traditional boat with very limited space considering there was 4 crew members and an entire band. We were skeptical there would be enough booze for all of us but we set sail and started into the Konyagi. We played a few drinking games before the band really kicked things up and we started a dance party. Things very quickly deteriorated as we smashed through 8 bottles of Konyagi (you calculated correctly, that is a bottle each). We had an absolute blast together, at one stage we took over the bands instruments and had our own sing along. The memories may be a bit foggy, but luckily there were lots of pictures taken. A very fun night!
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The next day we had a lazy start before heading to the pristine beach our accommodation was located on. We all had a laugh recounting the previous nights adventure before we decided it was time for a swim. Chris went first to test things out before Michael, Tiana and I joined. He gave us the thumbs up to say the water was nice, but as we entered the water he turned around and gave us two thumbs down. We thought he was kidding but when he reached us he was in rough shape. He had stepped on a rock that cut his foot and when he lifted his foot in pain a wave took him out and he fell onto a sea urchin. He turned around and showed us a massive clump of spikes protruding from his bottom. We quickly made our way back to the room where I attempted to remove them. They are very brittle and broke when I tried to remove them, leaving large pieces embedded under the skin. I realized I wasn’t equipped to deal with this so I ran to find our guide to see if he knew what to do. I couldn’t find him so I asked at our reception what I should do. They answered quickly and without hesitation.

You need a papaya and kerosene.

I was perplexed. I stated the obvious that I had neither of those things and even if I did I lacked the knowledge required to remedy the situation even if I did have them. The receptionist shouted to his friend (who I am confident didn’t even work there) who ushered me to follow him. He plucked a papaya from a tree and went to obtain some kerosene. I showed him to our room and gave him some privacy to work by heading back to the beach to collect our things. As I returned to the room he was leaving with a big smile on his face stating all was good. I asked Chris what happened and he said he stabbed the papaya to get the oil out, rubbed that on, and then poured a cap of kerosene over it. He then coated it again with the oil of the papaya. It was then a waiting game as it could take several days for the spikes to surface. Poor Chris could hardly sit down and spent a lot of the day laying in bed reading. The group, empathetic to his cause, lovingly nicknamed him prickle butt. I spent the afternoon playing volleyball and going for a swim once it was hightide.

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That night we had a group candlelight dinner on the beach. The food was acceptable but the setting was perfect. Chris and I had an early night and an early morning as we were departing Nungwi at 9 am. Our journey back to Dar was much easier than our journey getting there and we arrived without issue. My next post will cover the rest of our time in Tanzania!

Cheers!

*We booked our tour through African Overland Safaris, the Adventure Travel Division of Tshokwane Safaris, on behalf of Africa Travel Co. We experienced incredible customer service and were fully satisfied with the price we paid and the information we were provided about the tour. Find more information at: http://www.african-overland-safaris.com OR http://www.tshokwanesafaris.com.